About this Show

Key Capitol Hill Hearings

Speeches from policy makers and coverage from around the country.

NETWORK

DURATION
02:01:00

RATING

SCANNED IN
San Francisco, CA, USA

SOURCE
Comcast Cable

TUNER
Channel v24

VIDEO CODEC
mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
704

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Russia 30, Crimea 29, Us 14, U.s. 8, Imf 7, United States 6, Mr. Yanukovych 6, Yanukovych 5, Washington 5, European Union 4, Un 3, U.n. 3, United Kingdom 3, Navy 3, France 3, Germany 3, Moscow 3, Budapest 3, United 2, Alzheimer 's 2,
Borrow a DVD
of this show
  CSPAN    Key Capitol Hill Hearings    Speeches from policy makers and  
   coverage from around the country.  

    March 1, 2014
    12:00 - 2:01am EST  

12:00am
>> washington journal is live every morning at 7 a.m. eastern with your calls, tweets, and facebook comments on c-span. the -- conservative activists celebrated the fifth anniversary the t partnering -- tea party movement. you can watch the speakers saturday night beginning at 8 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> deaths from other major diseases like heart disease continue to decline, deaths from all climbers has increased almost 70% in the last 15 years.
12:01am
almost 5 million americans have alzheimer's. the third reason i am here is simply to show people that they are not alone. so few people share their personal stories, so people -- as so few people have someone to relate to. me talkingmeone like like this it would make us feel a little less alone. people whisper the word alzheimer's because the government whispers it. the alzheimer's community has been facing for decades, it is not enough. any spaghetti attention and funding it deserves and needs. i dream of the day were mice charity is not necessary and i go back to being the lazy self-involvement shot was meant to be. people looks to the government from open i hope you continue to do more steps to provide for more. >> seth rogen on capitol hill at advocating increased awareness
12:02am
and support for alzheimer's. a.m.day morning at 10:25 joseph will take your calls and comments on what he calls black power studies. american history tv visits the national gallery of art to learn .bout colonel robert gold sunday at 6 p.m. c-span, we bring public affair events from washington directly to you putting you into the room at congressional hearings, white house events, briefings and conferences and offering complete gavel-to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house all as a public service. we are c-span, created by the cable tv industry 35 years ago and funded by your local cable or satellite provider. like us on facebook and follow us on twitter.
12:03am
>> tonight, president obama's remarks about the tensions between ukraine and russia followed by the un's response to the situation with remarks by ambassadors to the u.n.. the ousted ukrainian president talks about his presidency and leaving ukraine at a news conference in russia. earlier today, president obama dressed tensions between ukraine and the russian federation and reports that russian troops were in the crimea region. he spoke to reporters in the briefing room for about five minutes. >> good afternoon, everybody. over the last several days, the united states has been responding to events as they have unfolded in the ukraine. through this crisis, we have been very clear about one fundamental principle. the ukrainian people deserve the opportunity to determine their
12:04am
own future. together with our european allies, we have urged an end to the violence and encourage ukrainians to pursue a course to forge a broad-based government and move to elections this spring. i also spoke with president putin. we have been in daily communication with russian officials. we have made clear they can be part of an international community effort to support the stability and success of a united ukraine going forward, which is not only in the interest of the people of the ukraine and the international community but also in russia interests. however, we are now deeply concerned of reports of military movements taken by the russian federation inside the ukraine. russia has a historic relationship with the ukraine, including cultural and economic ties and a military facility in crimea, but any violation of the ukraine sovereignty and
12:05am
territorial integrity would be deeply destabilizing, which is not in the interest of the ukraine, russia, or europe. it would represent a profound interference in matters that must be determined by the ukrainian people. it would be a clear violation of russia's commitment to respect the independence and sovereignty and the borders of the ukraine and international laws. just days after the world came to russia for the olympic games, it would invite the condemnation of nations around the world, and the united states will stand with the international community in affirming there will be costs for military intervention in the ukraine. the events of the past several months remind us of how difficult democracy can be in a country with deep divisions. but the ukrainian people have also reminded us that human beings have a universal right to determine their own future. right now the situation remains very fluid.
12:06am
vice president biden just spoke with the prime minister of the ukraine to assure him in this difficult moment the united states supports his government's efforts and stands for the sovereignty, territorial integrity, and a democratic future of the ukraine. i also commend the ukrainian government's restraint and commitment to uphold its international obligations. we'll continue to coordinate closely with our european allies. we will continue to communicate directly with the russian government. and we will continue to keep all of you in the press and the american people informed as events develop. thanks very much. >> are they russian forces in crimea?
12:07am
>> the un security council held an emergency session to discuss the unrest in ukraine. ambassadors to ukraine, united states, russia, and other countries spoke to reporters for about an hour and 10 minutes. >> i briefed the security council on the developments. this majority, constitutional majority which demonstrated the support not only of the new leaders in power but also the opposition. yesterday, the government was created. again, by overwhelming majority, which gives the legacy and the program of the government, a
12:08am
program in which is bringing the vision of how to cope with the current crisis, how to cope with the root of this crisis, and how to stabilize the situation. the basic principles of this program is the further formation of a civil society based on democratic principles and a guarantee of the rights of all the nation of minorities, including language. then unfortunately, i was informed of the recent developments in the ukraine. today, the parliament issued a resolution explaining in crimea they are observing the external presence, encouraging the clashes.
12:09am
the group of identified people yesterday addressed the ukrainian parliament and the cabinet of ministers on the threats. the parliament took the decision to have a referendum in may. the same situation happened recently in the two airports of crimea. the group of heavy-weaponed people blocked these airports. i briefed the security council. my people have the current situation at this moment of unspecified armed forces of the russian federation in the territory of the ukraine. we were informed about the
12:10am
illegal crossing of the border by russian military transports, about 10 of them arriving. 11 military cargo -- 11 military helicopters were also crossing borders, as well as the situation, the other situation. these are military attack helicopters, by the way, not transport, mi-24. we informed about -- just forgot the name. we informed, also, the brutal
12:11am
case of the russian navy officer moved his contingent when he was stopped and demanded to explain what was going on. he is a russian navy captain, who tried to explain his actions by recent decisions by the crimean authorities. i informed the security council about our extreme concern and expressed strong indignation regarding the recent post on the facebook page of the russian foreign ministry. i quote this posting. "instructions have been sent to the russian consulate general to undertake all necessary measures
12:12am
in order to stop the issue of russian passports to the police unit. this unit that was involved on the streets of kiev, and this was by the decision of the ministry of the interior." today, our ministry of foreign affairs expresses strong protest of the russian military maneuvers and their presence in crimea and demand them to remove all these units and people. i also informed the security council about the decision of the parliament and the minister to address the russian federation to hold a bilateral consultation under article seven
12:13am
of the treaty of partnership between the ukraine and the russian federation of 1997. today, our ministry got the peace proposal officially rejected by the russian side. the parliament took the decision to address all the parties of the budapest memorandum on security issues signed in 1994 between the ukraine and five countries. due to our decision to get rid of the nuclear armament. we addressed them to observe their obligations, including russia, who signed this memorandum.
12:14am
we asked the security council to consider the situation in the ukraine as seriously as it is and to undertake the appropriate measures to assist us to stop the dangerous developments which are challenging the international peace and our territorial integrity. thank you. >> how would you characterize the russian military movements, as aggression? >> yes, because some of them identified themselves as russians. we know specifically some of the units, for example the 22nd special brigade of the intelligence department, the foreign forces of the russian federation, we know involved the special law enforcement company.
12:15am
i gave you the name of this captain who led his group because of the decision of the crimean parliament, and we identified the presence of the russian aircraft and helicopters. the people who invaded in the parliament and the crimean parliament and who is keeping the airports there to be identified. >> can you tell us the name of the naval officer, and can you tell us where these aircraft are headed? are they going into crimea or other places? and whether your government has control over the two airports in crimea? >> so, where is the name. here. the ukrainian coast guard unit was blocked by a group of armed people under the command of a
12:16am
russian navy captain, captain of the first rank. so this is his title. captain alexander, who tried to explain his action by recent decisions of crimean authorities. still, we do not have full control of the airports. along with that, what we got from kiev. the main air control center has been captured by the armed forces of the russian federation.
12:17am
and so looking at the paper, again, all the signals are being suppressed by the equipment to control the air movement. so -- here we are. i was looking to find the papers where we have enough. >> what is your response to the yanukovych press conference held in russia? and where is your government's request to the international monetary fund, where does it stand, how long of a time frame are you looking at? >> thank you. luckily, i had a chance to listen to mr. yanukovych. i have been told this is comedy. even if you look back, as i was told by my colleagues, if you look at what he said literally,
12:18am
that because of our strategic relations with the ukraine -- look, the president of the ukraine stated it like that. a man who could step aside, even on the price of his own position, and not to permit people to kill others, he escaped from the country somewhere. and making statements which are making more and more harm. it is beyond immoral. so the imf. the delegation of the imf is coming to kiev next week. there were some statements from the imf that we are to negotiate some liberations in the
12:19am
position, but what is very important for us that we do understand the restrictions, because money to come should work for the reforms and not disappear, $2 billion, $3 billion, given by the russian side. they are to work for the reforms and the people in the government should know exactly where this money will go. >> what do you exactly expect from this session of the security council? besides calling it aggression, will you please again summarize how you would describe those who have agressed your country? >> we observed in crimea and a big amount coming from the russian federation.
12:20am
today, the delegation, the visitors from russia, russian parliament expanded in times. they are coming there, and their protection and so on and so forth. but we made a lot of statements 10 years ago, 15 years ago that any international invasion of our domestic affairs, yes, there are groups, pro-russians. but these groups are now making a serious mistake challenging our territorial independence and integrity. i would like you all not to be partial. look on the internet yourself and make analysis of yourself.
12:21am
who was appointed by the crimean parliament as the prime minister recently? and you will understand the same scenario happened elsewhere. the people with their past are the question. the people who made crime and so on. look and confirm. this is something which needs global understanding of the process. because the mechanisms are the same. what i expect from the security council and from all of you, we need the impartial true coverage of the situation in crimea, because it is one-sided. one-sided coverage from the russian side.
12:22am
what we need to have, we want you to help us bring the truth around the world what is going on. what do we expect from the security council and all my colleagues? first of all, first of all, moral support. to understand what is going on. what we want from them is political support. we want from them to do everything possible in terms of preventive diplomacy. still we have a chance to stop the negative developments and to stop all of this through strong voices from around the world. because we have observed this same scenario in many places. somebody comes from this side and into the vulnerable. >> again, thank you.
12:23am
if the security council does not give you the support also because russia is one of the permanent members with a bit of power, can you tell us what your government expects from the european union and the united states will do to calm the situation, to make the situation not escalate more? >> thank you. as you and me, i am following the final stance of the security council. i know that we have the support because several days ago, when the swiss presidency briefed the security council, the discussion brought to the exchange of the positions of the security council member states on the
12:24am
situation in the ukraine. all 14 members, 15 is russia, they stated that for the territorial integrity, they stated for the unity, they stated practically for the support. i count on this majority. but if the security council is really capable to deal with the situation like the ukraine has, in terms of security council reform, its effectiveness, the rapidness to react to stop the violence. i am referring to what the french leadership stated during the general assembly last september. to forget about the leaders when atrocities are standing before us.
12:25am
when the challenge to international peace is in front of us. well, this is my expectation, but also the expectation of the major general assembly supporters as well. i don't think that the respective country could pause itself about what they think about all of these atrocities. >> are you saying there is no way in which the current government of kiev would accept the idea of a referendum in crimea without outside impartial monitors to find out what the people of crimea want in the way of their government? >> to be a pure legalist, i should say the decision by the crimea parliament was taken illegally, but as well there is
12:26am
no legislation of the ukraine, neither crimea, it has to be regional or local referendums. there is a provision of the state law on the referendums that if any question refers to the territorial integrity of changing of the status of any regions of the ukraine, it should be a national referendum. so at least, in legal terms, the specific bill should be adopted to move with all of these thoughts and decisions. that's why in legal terms, constitutional terms, it is very difficult. it's very difficult to realize it now with all of the steps.
12:27am
>> ambassador, are you confident the new ukrainian government has the support of the ukrainian security forces in this crisis? and also, is the ukraine prepared to defend itself militarily, or does it have the capability to do so against the russian federation? >> good question. the opposition, before changing the constitutional majority in the parliament, before the creation of the government, they stated that they would be in favor of the government of the people's trust. and we had for the first time in our history very specific kind of consultations with people. so each of the candidates of the ministers, they were negotiated
12:28am
with the civil society organized on independence square. they organize the council. and all of the candidates were agreed with them. some of these candidacies were thrown out. so it means the minister of defense is a professional military man. he was supported by the people, and he is respected in the army. in the security, supporters from the opposition, his candidacy is supported by the people. and he used to be the chief of security during a time. in the minister of the interior.
12:29am
so people demonstrated their support, their full support in the ministry. they got those who were professional people. we count on that. the second question is very painful for me, because i don't want to think about any kind of military development around the settlement of the question. but i think -- i think we are strong enough to defend ourselves. we have a strong feeling, we have a spiritual feeling that we are right in what we are doing. >> can you talk about the resolution invoking the international criminal court?
12:30am
did this come up, and also the request to extradite mr. yanukovych back? what are the status of those actions? >> you can find the experts on how this works. well, it's not so easy to move directly. so what do we have. we should ratify the statute. we should, because it has been pending since the democratic governments failed to ratify it, and now it is ratified. but it does not mean that it could work. but what we have on the ground, there is the people's initiative. there is the initiative committee to connect all the
12:31am
crimes of the former power. this people's committee is headed by a professional, my former colleague and former ambassador to the united kingdom, a professor of international law, and former judge. they are collecting and making analysis of all of the crimes and atrocities of the former regime. then the next step, i don't know. i think, first of all, it should be decided in the ukrainian court by ukrainians, and then to see how we can move. but it was not so frightening for yanukovych, no, not that. when he had the parliament take
12:32am
their decision to decriminalize the article of the former criminal court which permits to release the prisoner, he disappeared. >> you say it was a comedy, the press conference? >> yes. >> but if instead of thinking it is a comedy, say the russian government thinks that yanukovych is still the president of the ukraine, do you think that sooner or later there will be a problem of who is the legal representatives of the ukraine? do you have everybody recognizing you at the moment as the ambassador of the ukraine? >> uh, a good question. but to answer the comedy, please look carefully how it was organized. no answers to the questions
12:33am
raised by the journalists. microphones were switched off. he kept saying, i am the president of the ukraine, i am the president of the ukraine, so it was the only task for him not to answer the questions. the questions were very tough. the question was, what can you say about your luxury palace and what we discovered there, and so on. as to his legacy as the president, as to the question which is pending, either it was the coup d'├ętat or was the normal process of the political changes in the parliament. the former speaker of the parliament who was the right hand of yanukovych made several statements. you could look at his video and what he said.
12:34am
he denied whatever yanukovych said about attempts to kill this former speaker. he talked about the process in the parliament as reformation of the parliamentary majority. who took the decision as to the creation of the government legally. what happens now and is pending again is the question. the first item in the agreement between the president and the opposition was he agreed and signed within 48 hours, the parliament should adopt a deal opening the doors to return to the constitution of 2004 which was illegally changed by the
12:35am
former government in 2010. the president should sign it. instead of doing that, he disappeared. it means that he left his constitutional duties, disappeared, and what to do. he disappeared announcing to his representative in the parliament and he found it in the parliament. the president told me he was about to resign. then the opposition leader called him and got the confirmation of what to do in that situation to move ahead. the parliament took the decision based on the fact that the president left his constitutional duties. he did not fulfill them to sign this important agreement which
12:36am
brings ukraine back to the parliamentary public. the authoritarian package of power on one hand of the council. it means that he left his duties, then he left the country. he stated -- it means that so --. >> the countries that are here, can you tell us if all of them recognize you as ambassador of the ukraine? >> yes, i am ambassador to ukraine until i am not or another ambassador comes to represent. >> isn't there an impeachment process? >> there is a procedure for the impeachment.
12:37am
but the parliament could take the decision on impeachment but the parliament took the decision by the fact the president left himself, his constitutional duties. it is practically the same. the parliament wanted by huge constitutional majority. it means that even his party in the parliament which there is a big faction of the party still existing. one of the leaders of this party declared that he was going to run for presidential elections. it gives right for me to state it was a legal process of changing of powers.
12:38am
the legal institutions in ukraine have looked. according to the constitution, the speaker of the parliament takes the duties. he is trying to perform correctly what is in his hands because he is acting. the government was fully created yesterday but two ministers, minister of defense and minister of foreign affairs, were acting because these positions are in the responsibility of the president. the elections will come in may. new president, one in the office will take the decision either to make these two the ministers or change them to somebody else.
12:39am
this is absolutely correctly done in accordance with the constitutional procedures. >> ambassador, besides moral support from this body, are you expecting or hoping for any concrete actions or help from security council having in mind that your country is under russian aggression as you said yourself? >> this is the legal action of -- after that. i gave you examples of the illegal presence of russians, military persons and equipment, and machinery. that is why the security council could, in my view, address the russian colleagues here, do what
12:40am
ukraine demands here. then together, let's find solutions on how to cool down the situation. this is what we expect. we also expect from our security guarantors, those who signed the budapest memorandum, united states, united kingdom, france, china, and russia. they could find what is probably the strongest solution, how to cool down the situation, and how to bring peace there. this is what we expect. >> is your country under aggression, having in mind you have foreign forces in your country or not? >> we have not stated it like that. we protest as to the illegal
12:41am
movement, presence. we do not want to be in a strong confrontation. we still demand from them to move out. let's think what we could do to calm down the people in the area. the only people that don't want conflict, they are looking for the solution. >> you were saying earlier about where is the military hardware going. where are the attack helicopters are they going to the port, the black sea? >> it is big information just before the security council.
12:42am
i gave you my piece of paper. you will see exactly what i spoke about where they were going. they blocked all of ukraine military presence there. military presence, police, and others. our people are not confronting. thinking about the solution and demanding the political solution and wisdom from those who send these people. >> two more questions. "the new york times" said one of the reasons why the former president would not signed the agreement with the european union was because the imf was going to impose austerity measures which would destabilize the ukrainian people as they cut their social services. now, there was a statement, a
12:43am
joke sort of, that the u.s. does not send in the marines anymore, they send in the imf. aren't you concerned that the austerity measures that are being imposed in western europe which are leading to tremendous social unrest may lead to even further disturbance in the ukraine? >> for three years, the former president and his partners in power kept encouraging ukraine saying we are in the european union after tomorrow. in two weeks before signing, he understood that something happened. initiating each and every page of this agreement. it sounded very strange. that's why people ran to the street. explain to us.
12:44am
if you know the problems, why did you never launch the negotiations with the european union? why did you bring us encouragement to the doors of the european union? what will be. we are conducting consultations, negotiations with european union. we are trying to find the challenges. it is very easy to avoid problems. the reforms which is more important but we are standing on the same page for 23 years -- no reforms. we expected it could bring reforms. this is not a club member ticket. this is motivation for reforms.
12:45am
motivation and inspiration for reforms. it never happened. what we will do and what we are doing, we are conducting consultations in agriculture and other fields to find where we are to be prepared to have some problems. it is an artificial problem. the figures presented last year of the possible losses were artificial. they were artificial. >> i just want to ask you when you talk about illegal presence, are you not referring to their existing russian bases in crimea?
12:46am
stick to the presence they had prior to now? >> two things. first of all, russian fleet presence. we had an agreement on exact rules, procedures within that. the first is our message to russia was this agreement was severely, severely violated because the troops moved out the zones and borders of their location. the second -- the newer arrivals. the russian military transport planed violated our borders and helicopters moved in. we have two problems. inside and outside. thank you. >> thank you very much.
12:47am
>> good afternoon, everybody. we have just come from an emergency meeting and consultation of the security council on ukraine. it is important that the council came together today on this subject. this is a critical moment for the future of ukraine and the ukrainian people. the u.s. stands with ukrainian people in determining their own destiny, their own government, their own future. we are gravely disturbed by reports of russian military deployment into the crimea. the u.s. calls upon russia to pull back the military forces that are being built up in the region to stand down and allow the ukrainian people the opportunity to pursue their own government, create their own destiny, and do so freely
12:48am
without intimidation or fear. we call upon all states to respect the sovereignty of ukraine. as various political actors begin making decisions about what role they will play in shaping that future, the international community has an opportunity and responsibility to stand firmly with the people of ukraine and in doing so to prevent unnecessary violence. given the present turbulence, it is useful for the council to reiterate certain principles, including the unity and territorial integrity of ukraine, the need for peaceful dialogue and prevention of further violence, and the fact that ukraine's future can only be determined by the ukrainian people. in recent days the world has bore witness to the overwhelming support that ukraine's new government has received from all major parties within the country. at the same time, we recognize that this newly formed government will require international assistance as it tries to correct the economic
12:49am
failures and political inequities of the past administration. a key to doing this and to ukraine's stability and economic security depends on it having healthy relations with all of its neighbors, including russia and the european union. the u.s. stands with the ukrainian people at this or -- remarkable moment and welcomes formation of the new government. we are pleased the cabinet is inclusive and representative and we congratulate the members and the ukrainian people on their historic achievement. the new government needs to continue its outreach to minority groups to help calm the situation and affirm its commitment to protecting minority rights. clearly this is a message that needs to be heard especially in the crimea, where we have seen actions and heard rhetoric that could threaten ukrainian stability. the u.s. would condemn any move to undermine ukraine's
12:50am
sovereignty or territorial integrity, which we expect all states to respect. the best way for the people of crimea to achieve their goals is to work peacefully within the established political system. to this end, the u.s. calls for an urgent international mediation mission to the crimea to begin to de-escalate the situation, and facilitate productive and peaceful political dialogue among all ukrainian parties. we encourage all ukrainians to pursue their aspirations through peaceful dialogue and nonviolent political activity. in combination, the new government's efforts with international assistance to bring about economic recovery and renewed hope for the future. thank you. i would be happy to take a couple of questions. >> who should be involved in this international mediation mission, and has the u.s.
12:51am
communicated directly to russia its concerns that it is greatly disturbed by these reports and wants russia to pull back? >> the president of the united states will be speaking on the issue of ukraine later today. you will hear directly from him. in terms of the mediation mission that we think is urgently needed, what is important is that it be seen as independent, credible. the secretary-general has dispatched an envoy to ukraine. he is the former ambassador to ukraine as many of you know. the o.s.c.e. has historic connections to many parts of ukraine and to the ukrainian people. what we think is important is
12:52am
that there is a mission at a time when the crisis seems to be escalating rather than the -- deescalating. we think that mission be carried out in service of the territorial integrity, sovereignty and unity of ukraine. >> can i ask you how you would describe the russian military movement in crimea? do these count as an act of aggression? >> i'm not going to characterize the movements. you will be hearing from the president shortly. the point i have already made is that we are deeply concerned by these reports, deeply concerned by what we see as the facts on the ground. we urge russia to join us in helping ukraine get back on a path to a brighter future. >> thank you very much. >> good afternoon.
12:53am
the members of the security council held an urgent meeting in response to a letter dated today by the permanent representative of ukraine to the security council. the briefing and close consultations -- the briefing was held by the assistant secretary-general, who briefed the council members on a situation in ukraine. the council members reviewed with concerns. during the discussion, support was expressed for ukraine's unity and sovereignty. the council agreed on the importance of restraint by all political actors in ukraine and
12:54am
called for inclusive political dialogue acknowledging the diversity of ukrainian society. [indiscernible] in my national capacity i can say that we have a deep concern about the situation, and the outbreak of violence in ukraine. we express our strong support for ukraine's sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity. we call on ukraine's foreign partners to abide by international law. during the discussions we were reminded of the obligations to observe multilateral agreements by all parties, including 1994 budapest memorandum on ukraine and ukraine and russian agreement of 1997. we reiterated the obligation of
12:55am
all member states to refrain in international relations from threats or the use of force against territorial integrity, political independence of any state in any manner inconsistent with the purposes of the u.n. >> [inaudible] was there anyone that did not recognize the actual government of ukraine? do we know who is in charge? >> individual member states who have various opinions will express these opinions. i will not speak on behalf of individual member states. >> will this require security council action or otherwise? >> we just heard a proposal. it has been put on the table.
12:56am
>> the ukrainian ambassador talked about whether the russian military airplanes that have crossed the borders, did they carry troops? what options is the security council considering to ease the unrest in the region? >> the ukrainian ambassador gave specific details. i would assume that it's better him who should speak about the situation in his own country than myself. with regards to the situation, if need be i would assume the next president of the council would be holding other meetings to follow-up from this. thank you. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. the un security council has just met to discuss the situation in ukraine. in the course of this meeting, i expressed my deep concern at the recent developments in crimea
12:57am
and particularly reports of russian troop deployment. the united kingdom believes that any newly deployed troops that do not answer to the ukrainian government should withdraw. my prime minister and fellow -- foreign secretary have been in touch with the leaders of the new government in ukraine and russia in the course of today. they have stressed the need for every country to respect the territorial integrity, unity and sovereignty of ukraine. my foreign secretary will travel to ukraine on sunday. we urge all parties, in and outside of ukraine, to exercise restraint and avoid actions or rhetoric that would inflame tensions further or impact on ukraine's sovereignty in any way. my foreign secretary welcomed assurances from acting president turchynov on respecting the rights of all minorities in
12:58am
ukraine. we want the people of ukraine to be free to determine their own future. it is clear that ukraine wants to move towards a different future and the voices of those who have protested over several months have been heard. a stable and prosperous ukraine is in all of our interests. this is not a zero-sum game. we should now all work together to help restore stability and protect ukraine's economy. thank you. >> the foreign secretary was in washington and met with the international monetary fund. what is the relationship between that process and the mediation process proposed or trying to address the issues in the crimea? >> there are a number of challenges facing the new government in kiev. one of them is the economy. my foreign secretary went to see the imf in washington because we
12:59am
believe the imf needs to take the lead in putting together a financial package to help the ukrainian government to recover from the economic crisis it is in, and to help the ukrainian government take the necessary tough decisions for the structural reforms required to put the economy back on track. this is not directly linked to any political mediation, but it is to address one of the key challenges of the new government that kiev faces. >> what are the next steps for the security council? will you consider mediating a mission to the ukraine and will you meet again in the coming days? >> i suspect the security council will meet regularly to discuss ukraine if the crisis continues. but i don't think the mediation proposal mission that was suggested does actually require security council approval.
1:00am
as i understand it, the idea was that the special envoy of the secretary-general -- who is in kiev -- might go to crimea. perhaps there might be some people who will go there and try to de-escalate the tension in crimea. that would not require a security council mandate. >> we just heard the ukrainian ambassador saying that he would expect from the security council some type of moral support. how do you read that and what does it mean besides condemning the actions? how would you describe that and how do you read that moral support? >> i heard a lot of support from security council members to his plea in the discussions we have just had.
1:01am
certainly there were no members of the security council who questioned the importance of preserving the territorial integrity, unity and sovereignty of ukraine. >> can you explain what private meeting means as opposed to consultation or other forms of security council meetings? >> this was a private meeting initiated by the lithuanian ambassador in a national capacity, not as presidency of the security council. it came in the wake of a letter from the ukrainian permanent representative asking the security council to meet. a private meeting means the security council members have an opportunity to hear from another party, in this case the ukrainian permanent representative, but without cameras there and without other members of the u.n. being present. >> the russian federation is at
1:02am
least as interested as anybody else in the stability and prosperity of ukraine. i would claim for obvious reasons of geography and history we are much more interested in that than some others who profess their knowledge about which way ukraine would like to go, and maybe this is one of the reasons for the current crisis in ukraine. too many visitors are claiming the path the ukrainians should be taking, rather than allowing the proper political process in the country. speaking about this particular meeting, its value for us was that it allowed us to retrace the crisis in ukraine and particularly the current state
1:03am
of the situation in ukraine. from our point of view, a crucial element of this instability and the problems in various parts of ukraine is that the february 21 agreement was discovered immediately after it was signed. you will recall there were key elements in that agreement. first, the agreement envisaged a constitutional process with a consultation of everybody in ukraine that would produce a constitution which will take care of the interests of all of the actors and regions there. second, there should be a government of national unity. third, the radicals carrying weapons in the streets should lay down their arms. the presidential election was envisaged towards the end of the year and there was also an important element there during the investigation by opposition
1:04am
of the authorities, including international factors, of violence which had taken place in ukraine in the course of the crisis. unfortunately, all of those things were discarded. it created the current situation of instability and concern in some regions of the country of where things were going. the government cannot be described by any definition all standard as a government of national unity. it contains only people from a particular region, particular regions of the country, central and western ukraine. it does not contain representatives from various political forces. it is something that is causing concern in some parts of ukraine, especially that. almost the first decision that was taken after president
1:05am
yanukovych left key was to abrogate along the languages, which was adopted in 2012 after a very difficult process leading to adopting that agreement. it was seen as we understand it, by people in a number of regions in ukraine, as an effort of the people who found themselves in power in kiev was not to bring about a democratic society, but to impose their political will on the rest of the country. in our view, this is what caused a bitter reaction in some parts of ukraine, including crimea, where they saw efforts to intimidate various political players. for example, this announcement that the so-called friendship ring will defend to crimea.
1:06am
there were friendship trains, people traveling from one region to another. youth groups, etc. there it was meant as a sign of intimidation, exercising force and intimidation on various political factions in crimea, the way we saw happening in kiev before. the international community first needs to think of how to bring about this political process which was envisaged in february the 21st agreement, and i think only that would provide solid ground for various forms of assistance, including financial assistance to ukraine, which some colleagues are talking about. we are not prepared to provide when russia came with its offer for financial assistance in the course of the crisis.
1:07am
ladies first. >> thank you. there has been talk of an international mediation mission. is that something you would approve of, join, or ignore? >> it is something that needs to be discussed and analyzed, this idea. the point i made in consultation is that we need to ask the authorities in the crimea what they feel about this kind of a mission. as a matter of principle, we are against imposed mediation. if they are comfortable with that, we would have nothing against it. >> you just mentioned president yanukovych. you saw the press conference today. what do you think about what he said, that he is still the
1:08am
president of ukraine? >> we think the legal aspect of declaring him to be not the president any longer is very questionable. >> the ambassador of ukraine told us before he recorded and presented us with some of the units and helicopters presented by the russian federation. he even agreed with the qualification that it was an act of aggression. he reiterated. how do you describe the presence of military units from russia? >> we have an agreement with ukraine on the presence of the russian black sea fleet. we are acting within the framework of that agreement. i understand that my ukrainian colleague tried to distance himself from this definition of aggression. if you were to use that definition, it would be unacceptable. >> if he remained in kiev, he
1:09am
would have been able to exercise his constitutional rights -- >> this is the problem. immediately after this agreement was signed, and not just by president yanukovych and opposition leaders, but the signatures of the four leaders of germany, france and poland. supported by the european union. there were threats that they would be storming the presidential residence unless he resigns by 10:00 the next morning. that is my understanding, that is what caused him to leave the city. that was not something envisaged in the agreement. that was a clear breach of that agreement. >> the international monetary fund, they're offering money -- would you participate in that -- >> we are prepared to discuss various approaches to dealing
1:10am
with the very dramatic economic situation. for us, coming from the russian perspective, it is difficult to discuss it specifically because we don't know what the problem of this government will be. is it going to be a government that will be supported by the broad segment of the ukrainian population? we are open to the idea of the international community meeting to help ukraine but there are too many question marks. >> can i ask you a further question about military movements in the crimea? there have been reports of armed men at airports, reports of more military helicopters coming in to crimea. >> we are trying to ask our colleagues to postpone this meeting till tomorrow to get more information.
1:11am
a wanted to go ahead now. i don't have specific information. i recall from history books that one world one started, some newspapers in the u.k. reported that they saw a russian cossacks at the railway station. those reports are not always true. >> regardless of what the situation is now, is russia willing -- is russia willing to militarily intervene in ukraine to achieve your political goals? >> [laughter] even the question is aggravating. >> what is the role of roberts in ukraine? >> we are concerned that he has been pushed into this thing. about his trip, it is a serious issue.
1:12am
unfortunately at various stages of his campaign he was played with by the new ukrainian authorities. the first meeting with the new chairman, the press service reported that he supported the current processes. what that meant under those circumstances was not clear. the day before there was the favor 21 agreement supported by the secretary-general. one would expect him to support this agreement that was signed the day before. then we are giving the explanation that he did not really say it. what he said was completely different. if you're asking again about the possibility [indiscernible] why not? it's not a situation where one
1:13am
can improvise. we have seen too much improvise nation rather than sticking to the solid ground of february the 21st agreement. >> at the beginning of the syrian crisis, you say the western countries were creating a situation that would get worse. i remember i was here and you said something like that. how do you judge what the european union, united states -- are you ready to say something similar? did they behave in a way they should not? >> i don't want to draw any parallels between syria and ukraine. we definitely saw some imposed mediation, and some people who were trying to determine for ukraine what they wanted. you remember the footage, when the speaker of the parliament from one of the baltic countries
1:14am
was speaking. the foreign minister of germany was actually marching in the demonstration with the opposition. now we're going to have a referendum on the independence of scotland. can we expect baltic politicians marching there among those who are pitching for independence? let's see if this is going to happen. some of those things were quite graphic and in our view completely had nothing to do with the idea of no interference. they emphasize sovereignty but they behave as though ukraine was a province of the european union. that is at least impolite towards our ukrainian friends. then maybe more importantly, there was an effort to determine for ukraine what they need to do. you alluded to president yanukovych. i think he mentioned it briefly
1:15am
in today's press statement. they did realize, the ukrainian authorities, that signing of that association in agreement would entail serious economic consequences for them. they tried to buy some time. you see what happened. they were crowded in telling they were doing the wrong thing and this whole trouble started. they have a democratically elected president who had majority and a democratically elected parliament and his election was coming up a year from now. then he offered the post of prime minister to him. he could've taken the post.
1:16am
he could have signed the association agreement if you wanted to. he should've taken responsibility for the consequences. they went for toppling the president on changing operation. it was a dramatic and traumatic experience for the entire ukrainian society. that interference from our western colleagues has not been helpful. they have a certain responsibility for those dramatic consequences and responsibility for not following through with the agreement that they themselves brought about and affixed their signatures to on february the 21st. >> what is moscow's bottom line? >> the best way to resolve the crisis is to look hard at the february 21 agreement and try to do things the way they were described there. they need to have a constitutional dialogue and process of forming a new constitution.
1:17am
they need to refrain from hasty presidential election, which will most likely create more friction within the country. they need to stop trying to intimidate other regions and other political forces. they need to show in their actual policies that this is about national reconciliation and unity, territorial integrity of ukraine. they need to work towards establishing the common ground there. so far we don't see that in practice. we heard declarations to that effect but don't see that in practice. thank you very much. [captioning performed by the national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2014] >> the obama administration is reevaluating its lens to attend
1:18am
a summit in sochi this summer. journal,xt washington we will talk with cook political reporter david wasserman. to then nutrition changes labels. paulefense news reporter will discuss technology programs. live aton journal is 7:00 a.m. eastern. with your calls, tweets, and facebook, and. comments.k >> conservative activists gathered in washington to mark the fifth anniversary of the tea party movement. you can watch the speakers
1:19am
starting at 8:00 p.m. eastern. >> >> ukrainian president -- this video comes to c-span the russia today. it is about one hour. >> we will organize the conference in the following way. mr. yanukovych would like to tell you a few words. then we will have the question time. you have the floor, mr. yanukovych. distinguished viewers, journalists.
1:20am
it is time for me to announce my decision to fight for the future of ukraine. i have decided to go public about it. no one has deposed me. i was forced to leave ukraine because of the threat to my life and the life of my relatives. as you know, the power in ukraine was seized by nationalists, pro-fascists, youth mobs who represent a
1:21am
minority of the ukrainian population. how do i see the solution to the crisis? we need to fulfill what was laid down by the crisis settlement agreement between the president of ukraine and opposition leaders in the presence of the foreign ministers of france, germany, and poland, as well as a representative of the russian federation. we need to embark on constitutional reform and finish it i -- by september 2014. the reform needs to balance out all the branches of power.
1:22am
then we need to hold presidential reelections in december of 2014, and then to adopt a new constitution. of course it's very important to conduct an unbiased investigation of the violence, given the monitoring of the european authorities, and all of the arms and weapons need to be handed over to the police. all of the buildings and streets and squares need to be de-blocked and barricades removed. all of the armed gunmen need to leave the streets, need to ensure normal life for the
1:23am
citizens of ukraine, including in kiev and other regions of the country. we need to take into account the interests of all the regions of ukraine. it will be difficult to get out of this difficult situation. the turbulent time that we face and the casualties are the consequences of the political crisis that ukraine faces. this is the result of the irresponsible policy of the west. ukraine is a strong country and we will prevail. we will get out of this crisis.
1:24am
i also urge to hold a ukrainian referendum. as for the issues that will be put on the referendum, we need to discuss these issues with the participation of the broad-spectrum of society. and of course, they have to reflect relevant problems the country is facing, also in terms of the states. >> yanukovych, i would like to hear out some questions. the first question is about my colleague. you're welcome to ask a question. the mic isn't working. please introduce yourself. the mic is not working.
1:25am
>> i am from the interfax agency. [indiscernible] >> please just talk as loudly as you can. >> yesterday he said that the agreement concluded in february the 21st was not fulfilled and my second question is that the judges of the constitutional court have been deposed in ukraine. the russian constitutional court has provided feedback on that. how could you comment on that? thank you. >> thank you, i got the question.
1:26am
the agreement that was supposed to give a solution to the crisis had to be completed by both sides. the international intermediary is reliable. i believe in the bona fide character of the mediation. the agreement was controversial but despite that i signed it and the leading opposition signed it too. the ministers of foreign affairs of three states also signed it. there was a critical decision at that point, according to the
1:27am
elements that were present and in other regions they had to hand over their weapons to de-block the area, so they the -- see that was not enforced. as a result, kiev was flooded with gunmen. they started to destroy houses, cultural facilities and churches. innocent civilians suffered. people were robbed and beaten up in the streets and that is still happening. that is why that agreement gave
1:28am
a certain hope that what ensued later is hard to describe. this is lawlessness, terror, complete chaos and lack of power. so these are decisions that were taken by the government. some of the m.p.'s were subject to physical violence. they cast stones at them. they were intimidated and they were taken to the square, where they took an oath of loyalty going forth. this cannot be called the job of the parliament. this is the job that was dumped
1:29am
on my opposition forces. depressed by my gunmen and the seal of the key. the governments which they called the cabinets of victory. is this a victory over the ukrainian people, i'm asking you? it should have been a government of national unity. today it is difficult to find the proper words to describe how the power is being formed today. the names which became known across the world. these are the people who promote
1:30am
violence. they are well known around the world. and in this world, they incite fear. i believe that the ukrainian parliament is not legitimate, and i still maintain that the which was not fulfilled, given the condition that it would be fulfilled, it could have calmed down the situation to a certain extent, and would launch the legal process of resolving the political crisis in ukraine. that was a way out of the dead
1:31am
end, and the radicals have orced us into this dead end. >> the second part of the question, about the tragedy. >> this is an unprecedented ove. not just for ukraine, but for any part of the world, when a culture is destroyed, or the state itself is destroyed, we should p allow this to happen. >> i don't know if the mic is going to work. i'm going to give the floor to andre a lot of ho has voice. ive him the mic.
1:32am
>> mr. yanukovych, do you feel ashamed? >> ashamed, no. first of all, i would like to offer my apologies first and foremost to the veterans, to the ukrainian people. or what happened in ukraine. for the fact that i didn't have enough strength to maintain for the and to allow ess to happen. >> channel 1. on the 21 of february, you made concessions to the opposition. this agreement was broken by the e.u. then suddenly you fled the country.
1:33am
could you explain in detail why you fled the country. my second question is, why didn't you speak directly to the people straight away. and my next question is, why didn't you ask the e.u. for help. thank you for the questions. >> first of all, i didn't flea anywhere. i went from tiev to the city of hadkev. during that trip, when i was exposed to v, i was gunfire from automatic weapons. and the guard that exposed me subject to gunfire from all sides. i didn't leave alone. we didn't flea. we were supposed to meet with some of the activists.
1:34am
activists are supporting, and there was a forum that was supposed to take place, a onference. we arrived there late at night because we had to do that. when we arrived in the city of kharkiv, on the morning of the 22nd, from the early morning, we received the information that radical elements, radical groups started arriving in kharkov. it was not about fear. i didn't have any fear.
1:35am
i needed to compli with the safety conditions. i had to maintain these conditions. it is not my job to set the rules. the speaker cision of the ukrainian parliament was there with me, and i asked then gonyevk. the city of hey had a plane ready.
1:36am
and i was going to tell everyone what had happened in the city. we took too helicopters. i warned them that we needed to change the direction. they said that it looked like we were heading toward russia, and that they would signal fighters o ground us. and of course those represent pilots, they were law-abiding cities, they decided to head back and they decided to land in ganiv.y of
1:37am
took the car, and we went to krymir. we arrived late at night. the intentions that i had were ruined. i received calls from the embers of my family. they said, even the youngest was supposedly plaquelisted. my eldest son went to the kindergarten facility, he took him away, and he said, i cannot isk the life of my family. that was what the situation was ike.
1:38am
>> i would like someone from the benches to speak now. the man in the blackjack et. why anukovich, can you say we are here now and not in moscow, for example? and the second thing, could you please comment on the situation of the premiere? i represent red tv moscow. what do you think is going to in the future?ir >> i am here because a friend of mine lives here near the city of ostov.
1:39am
i came to find some temporary refuge here for now. everything that is happening in imir today is a natural response to the bandits' regime hange that took place in kiev. the regulation of power is a group of radical monsters. if you compare them to the 45 llion population of ukraine, of course. ukraineans will not have -- [indiscernable]
1:40am
of course i sympathize what is happening today, formulation of a militia unit. they want to defend themselves, their families, and their homes. this is a natural desire of people. -- krymir needs to stay strong in ukraine.
1:41am
>> are you going to ask russia for assistance in the situation krymir? when are you going to come back o ukraine? >> i believe that any military actions in this situation are unacceptible. none whatsoever. and i'm not going to request any military assistance. i believe ukraine needs to stay united. as for the possibility of my coming back, i will return to ukraine once the conditions of my security and the security of ensured. will be
1:42am
>> how did you get here? did you get here by plane? id you meet president putin? there are very few ukrainian journalists here. so i would like to ask some more questions. you said you are going to fight for the future of ukraine. do you know that all your party fellows call you a trader. what do you think of the
1:43am
military exercises going on in ukraine? >> can you repeat the first two questions that you asked. > how did you get into russia? did you meet with putin. >> no, that's it. that's it. please sit down. no more questions. >> so here is how i came to russia. i came here thanks to the officers. that's the way i'm going to put it. they did their duty. and they helped me to stay alive number two, i did not meet mr.
1:44am
putin. i had a phone call with him. we agreed that once i have an opportunity, once the president of russia has an opportunity, we will meet. i don't know when this will happen. >> please keep calm. >> mr. president, the agreement that you signed, no one is peaking of it today. it was made no mention of at all today. don't you think you have been deceived when you were made to
1:45am
sign this agreement? and how would you explain, how would you account for the -- for this division in the meart of regents? >> i did not quite get the uestion. > yes, i told you, they didn't deceive me, they deceived the ukrainian people. and in such a situation, i would like to get a response from those who also signed this agreement. to thised as guarantors agreement. they ensured that this settlement agreement would not be missed.
1:46am
but i saw no reports of any cause or desire to talk to me over the phone, no reports in he media were available. this is not enough. we need to meet and discuss this issue. i think this issue is still on the table. >> how do you account for the division in the party? >> i will also reply to your question and the question from the news agency.
1:47am
i do not want to judge them. let god judge them. judge their behavior in these times. still, i don't condemn people -- some were forced to take the decisions there. ouses were burned. they were threatened with weapons. i had a chance to talk to some of the m.p.'s over the phone when i was still in ukraine. what i heard from them was really terrifying. i will hope, i will pray to god at the authorities that be
1:48am
will come to their senses and stop the violence that is taking lace in ukraine right now. >> now let's ask somebody from he last row. > mr. yanukovych, how do you think ukraine came to the default situation? our opponents are saying it is because you have taken this money to off shores. my second question is, are you planning to take part in the presidential election in may in ukraine? thank you. >> as for the situation, i don't think that anyone in the world would deny the fact that this
1:49am
the ion arose when situation was destablized in ukraine. and ukraine stayed such an mportant part of red russia. we did pay salaries regularly, and we had intention to continue . the ukrainian people are aware of that. and we worked hard to ensure that all these development programs will be respected. of course we were getting ready for the 2015 election.
1:50am
o secret about that. and we will do everything in our power to leave it a stable country that has a great prospect of development. d a number of our supporters were the biggest among different political parties. now the full responsibility rests with those who led the country to the crisis and to the chaos and to disaster, full lown disaster.
1:51am
[indiscernible] the united states denied opposition forces. the election has to take place in compliance with the ukrainian onstitution. >> please introduce yourself first.
1:52am
>> you have already said today that the ukrainian people betrayed you. now you are talking about your future plans for the election. who are you going to rely on in your election campaign? >> i think you got the statement wrong. he's not going to take part in the elections. but in any case, i am going to continue to be in politics.
1:53am
>> i didn't hear the question. >> mr. yanukovich, in what way do you see the future of ukraine? thank you. >> partially i did respond to this question earlier. i would like to reaffirm that and i have a real chance once i have the conditions and once my safety is ensured, including by the international mediators, once my personal safety is ensured, i will come back to ukraine as soon as ossible. secondly, i do see a way of resolving this crisis. first and foremost, is the
1:54am
federal agreement that was unilaterally reached. and the west needs to take full responsibility for that. we need to come back to this issue and get a reply from both sides. the responsibility for not implementing these agreements rests with the west. they initiated it. they send their foreign minister to kiev. they have coordinated all of these issues. they have aprofedse all -- they have approved all of those items on the agenda. the counselor of ministers was
1:55am
n brussels that day. that is my position. will maintain it. >> it was reported today that the swiss government arrested your assets in swiss banks as well as the assets of aleksander yanukovych, and there is also a criminal case being bra brought against some of the former members of the ukrainian government. and my second question will follow later. i will sit down. >> i don't think there is a single person in this audience who would take the pleasure of what is happening in kiev. it is the other way around, i
1:56am
eel. you can understand how my supporters feel, and the people who are suffering today. this is a lack of power and chaos that ensues. i have addressed and i would like to address once again all people responsible for what is taking place. i urge them to hand back the power again. there is still some time for -- to change the direction. and to change direction with the
1:57am
patrons from the west. >> what do you think of yulia tymoshenko being released from prison? supporters who defended you -- >> these are the people that stood there without any weapons.
1:58am
hey defended us. the they threw molotov cocktails at them. shot at them. i apologize to them. i would like to apologize again. these brave men were innocent. they were innocent people, and they suffered. as for yulia tymoshenko. i don't know what her destiny will be like, whether she will take part in the election or not. i don't know whether she will have any future in politics or not. why she was convicted.
1:59am
took the verdict her was enforced and nditions in the penetentiary ere exclusive. she was there with quite good conditions. is an issue oday a legal standpoint. i never meant harm for her, and i have always been vocal about
2:00am
that. i do not have any negative feelings toward her. but the agreement she signed amounted to about 20 billion in losses. for the horrible krainian people. as for different points of view, they disagreed with my position nd the position of the courts. again, the ukrainian court responded to that question.

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)